BOLIVIA

Image

BOLIVIA

141,124

Total Cases

8,672

Total Deaths

109,769

Total Recovered

22,683

Total Active Cases

+14

New Deaths

+172

New Cases


via gzeromedia10/27/2020

Bridging the digital divide – a new chapter in the life of the public library - GZERO Media

The role of the public library has evolved over time. As we move online at an even faster rate, knowledge, entertainment and opportunities for education and employment are found on the internet. Those living in well-connected, affluent places may have come to take internet access for granted. But th...

via gizmodo.au10/26/2020

How Last Year’s Pandemic Simulation Foreshadowed Covid-19 - Gizmodo Australia

One year ago, at the last minute, I decided to attend a presentation held by the Johns Hopkins Centre for Health Security at a Manhattan hotel facing Central Park. Epidemiologists, economists, and other public health experts ran a simulation of what a realistic pandemic would look in the modern world. The...

via thehour10/19/2020

Morales party claims victory in Bolivia's presidential vote - Thehour.com

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - Bolivia appeared Monday to be shifting sharply away from the conservative policies of the U.S.-backed interim government that took power last year after leftist President Evo Morales resigned, with the self-exiled leader's party claiming victory in a weekend presidential election. The leading rival of Morales's handpicked successor, Luis Arce, conceded defeat as did interim President Jeanine Áñez, a bitter foe of Morales. .Officials released no formal, comprehensive quick count of results from Sunday's vote, but two independent surveys of selected polling places gave Arce a lead of roughly 20 percentage points over his closest rival - far more than needed to avoid a runoff. Áñez asked Arce "to govern with Bolivia and democracy in mind." Arce, meanwhile, appealed for calm in the bitterly divided nation saying he would seek to form a government of national unity under his Movement Toward Socialism party. "I think the Bolivian people want to retake the path we were on," Arce declared, surrounded by a small group of supporters, some of them in traditional Andean dress in honor of the country's Indigenous roots. To win in the first round, a candidate needs more than 50% of the vote, or 40% with a lead of at least 10 percentage points over the second-place candidate. The independent counts, sponsored by the Catholic Church and civic groups, indicated Arce had a little over 50% of the vote and a roughly 20-point advantage over centrist former President Carlos Mesa, who acknowledged defeat. The formal official count at midafternoon had Arce a few thousand votes ahead of Mesa, at nearly 40% to just under 39%. Only about 30% of the ballots had been tallied, but those votes appeared to be largely from urban areas rather than the rural...

via deccanherald10/18/2020

Bring your own pen: How Bolivia is voting amid Covid-19 pandemic - Deccan Herald

Deni Blanco used to sell food outside voting locations in La Paz each election cycle, an easy way to make some extra money. This year, as Bolivia holds elections in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, she is selling something else: pens. "My sister saw it on TV, that this time every voter should bring their own pen to vote, and she said, 'Why don't we sell them?'" Blanco


via hindustantimes10/02/2020

Photos | Bolivian women skateboard in traditional Aymara garb to showcase their culture - Hindustan Times

The traditional bowler hats, bright blouses and long, plaited “pollera” skirts of the young women contrast with the skateboards under their feet as they swoop back and forth on the skate ramp in Bolivia’s largest city. The girls of the collective “ImillaSkate,” a mixture of Aymara and English meaning girl and skateboarding, wear the Indigenous dress of their grandmothers to showcase their culture and promote the sport among women. “I love this sport, I love my culture and I love being a woman, and that is what motivates me to continue,” said Ayde Choque, while tying the laces of her black Vans shoes and donning the face mask required amid the new coronavirus pandemic. The group of five young people in La Paz joined a movement that was born in the central Bolivian region of Cochabamba last July. There, more than a dozen young women drew attention with a video posted on Facebook showing them skating through the streets of Cochabamba dressed in Indigenous garb.

via theheraldreview10/01/2020

Bolivian women skateboard in Aymara garb to showcase culture - The Herald Review

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - The traditional bowler hats, bright blouses and long, plaited "pollera" skirts of the young women contrast with the skateboards under their feet as they swoop back and forth on the skate ramp in Bolivia's largest city. The girls of the collective "ImillaSkate," a mixture of Aymara and English meaning girl and skateboarding, wear the Indigenous dress of their grandmothers to showcase their culture and promote the sport among women. "I love this sport, I love my culture and I love being a woman, and that is what motivates me to continue," said Ayde Choque, while tying the laces of her black Vans shoes and donning the face mask required amid the new coronavirus pandemic. The group of five young people in La Paz joined a movement that was born in the central Bolivian region of Cochabamba last July. There, more than a dozen young women drew attention with a video posted on Facebook showing them skating through the streets of Cochabamba dressed in Indigenous garb. Before, the skateboarding women in La Paz wore tight jeans, loose t-shirts and caps when they skated. Aymara women traditionally wear ankle-length layered skirts, embroidered blouses and shawls with a bowler hat perched atop their long black braids. "My grandmother wore her 'chola' dress with pride, and I want to revalue her culture," said Milenda Limachi. Limachi said at first she fell a lot, but a friend encouraged her to continue and she got better. "Here it is mostly men who practice" skateboarding, she said. "But the world will know that in Bolivia there are women who do it." Huara Medina, organizer of the group in Cochabamba, called it "a joy that the group is growing." "We are also in La Paz and little by little we will be reaching other parts of the...

via caldwell.edu09/29/2020

Caldwell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month - Caldwell University News

Caldwell University is celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. Throughout the month, we will highlight some of the many Hispanic members of our community who positively influence our university and society.   Earlier this year Caldwell University was formally recognized as a Hispanic-Serving Institution by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Postsecondary Education, reflecting the growth in …

via gzeromedia10/27/2020

What We're Watching: New US Supreme Court justice, Morales can go back to Bolivia, Nile dam talks resume - GZERO Media

SCOTUS battle rages on: In a major victory for US President Donald Trump just a week out from the presidential election, the Republican-controlled Senate confirmed Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, who was then swiftly sworn into office at a nighttime ceremony at the White House. Barrett...

via menafn10/26/2020

State of Qatar provides medical aid to Bolivia - MENAFN.COM

Qatar's non-resident ambassador to Peru and Bolivia Ali bin Hamad al-Sulaiti delivered medical aid and materials provided by Qatar to Bolivia to support its efforts in limiting the spread of Covid-19. The aid was received by Charge d'Affairs of the embassy of Bolivia in Peru Luis Fernando Peredo Rojas at the headquarters of the Qatari embassy in Peru. In a


via spectrumlocalnews10/18/2020

Bolivia's vote a high-stakes presidential redo amid pandemic - Spectrum News

Bolivians are settling in for a tense, and possibly long, vote count as results trickle in from Sunday’s high-stakes presidential election meant to put an end to political turmoil following last year’s annulled ballot that resulted in leftist President Evo Morales’ resignation

via abc.net.au10/14/2020

Politics and Covid in Ian Dunt's UK. Fossil fuels and the Bolivian election. Journalist Geoff Kitney's memoirs - ABC News

As COVID cases rise in UK Ian Dunt assesses the political response. Bret Gustafson considers how fossil fuels have changed Bolivia and what's at stake in this weekend's election. In his new memoir, Beyond the Newsroom, Geoff Kitney looks back some of the big stories he covered during his fifty years as a journalist.

via wwaytv310/01/2020

Brunswick County Courthouse overcoming the challenges of COVID-19 - WWAY NewsChannel 3

The nation continues to deal with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. It's not just businesses feeling the pressure, local judicial systems have been put to the test as well. The Brunswick County Courthouse has found a new way to operate not only safer, but smarter.

via thetelegraph10/01/2020

Bolivian women skateboard in Aymara garb to showcase culture - Alton Telegraph

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - The traditional bowler hats, bright blouses and long, plaited "pollera" skirts of the young women contrast with the skateboards under their feet as they swoop back and forth on the skate ramp in Bolivia's largest city. The girls of the collective "ImillaSkate," a mixture of Aymara and English meaning girl and skateboarding, wear the Indigenous dress of their grandmothers to showcase their culture and promote the sport among women. "I love this sport, I love my culture and I love being a woman, and that is what motivates me to continue," said Ayde Choque, while tying the laces of her black Vans shoes and donning the face mask required amid the new coronavirus pandemic. The group of five young people in La Paz joined a movement that was born in the central Bolivian region of Cochabamba last July. There, more than a dozen young women drew attention with a video posted on Facebook showing them skating through the streets of Cochabamba dressed in Indigenous garb. Before, the skateboarding women in La Paz wore tight jeans, loose t-shirts and caps when they skated. Aymara women traditionally wear ankle-length layered skirts, embroidered blouses and shawls with a bowler hat perched atop their long black braids. "My grandmother wore her 'chola' dress with pride, and I want to revalue her culture," said Milenda Limachi. Limachi said at first she fell a lot, but a friend encouraged her to continue and she got better. "Here it is mostly men who practice" skateboarding, she said. "But the world will know that in Bolivia there are women who do it." Huara Medina, organizer of the group in Cochabamba, called it "a joy that the group is growing." "We are also in La Paz and little by little we will be reaching other parts of the...

via news.yahoo09/29/2020

Bolivia's interim government splits as ministers quit over economy - Yahoo News

Óscar Ortiz stepped down from the economy portfolio, citing "deep differences" and pressure from people close to interim President Jeanine Añez, a conservative former Senator who took over in a power vacuum after fraught elections last year. Bolivia is heading toward a re-run of that vote


via gzeromedia10/20/2020

Thailand's monarchy, Nigeria protests, Bolivia's new president & COVID latest - GZERO Media

Watch Ian Bremmer discuss the World In (more than) 60 Seconds:With Thailand's anti-government movement growing, is the monarchy in danger? What is happening in Nigeria? Bolivia,elected a new president. Who is Luis Arce, and how will he leave the country? Final question, what is the global COVID update?

via spectrumnews110/19/2020

Bolivia's vote a high-stakes presidential redo amid pandemic - Spectrum News 1

Bolivians are settling in for a tense, and possibly long, vote count as results trickle in from Sunday’s high-stakes presidential election meant to put an end to political turmoil following last year’s annulled ballot that resulted in leftist President Evo Morales’ resignation

via gzeromedia10/15/2020

What We’re Watching: Europe battles COVID second wave, Bolivians vote, Kyrgyz president quits - GZERO Media

Europe's disastrous "second wave:" As COVID-19 cases continue to surge across Europe, the European Parliament cancelled plans to reconvene next week in Strasbourg, France, saying that the current uptick means that "traveling is too dangerous." It's the second time since September that in-person meet...

via voanews10/06/2020

Peru's Main Airport Reopens for International Flights After Closing Due to Coronavirus - Voice of America

Peru's main airport is receiving international flights for the first time in six months after restrictions were put in place to help control the spread of the coronavirus.  Speaking at Monday's reopening in the capital city Lima, Peruvian President Martín Vizcarra expressed confidence that everything had been done to guarantee the opening of international flights does not increase the risk of the coronavirus spreading.  Jorge Chavez International Airport is now accepting flights to and from 11 destinations, including Ecuador, Bolivia, Colombia, Panama, Paraguay, Uruguay and Chile.  Jorge Alvarado

via wwaytv310/01/2020

Brunswick County Courthouse overcoming the challenges of covid-19 - WWAY NewsChannel 3

The nation continues to deal with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. It's not just businesses feeling the pressure, local judicial systems have been put to the test as well. The Brunswick County Courthouse has found a new way to operate not only safer, but smarter.

via newmilfordspectrum10/01/2020

Bolivian women skateboard in Aymara garb to showcase culture - The Greater New Milford Spectrum

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) - The traditional bowler hats, bright blouses and long, plaited "pollera" skirts of the young women contrast with the skateboards under their feet as they swoop back and forth on the skate ramp in Bolivia's largest city. The girls of the collective "ImillaSkate," a mixture of Aymara and English meaning girl and skateboarding, wear the Indigenous dress of their grandmothers to showcase their culture and promote the sport among women. "I love this sport, I love my culture and I love being a woman, and that is what motivates me to continue," said Ayde Choque, while tying the laces of her black Vans shoes and donning the face mask required amid the new coronavirus pandemic. The group of five young people in La Paz joined a movement that was born in the central Bolivian region of Cochabamba last July. There, more than a dozen young women drew attention with a video posted on Facebook showing them skating through the streets of Cochabamba dressed in Indigenous garb. Before, the skateboarding women in La Paz wore tight jeans, loose t-shirts and caps when they skated. Aymara women traditionally wear ankle-length layered skirts, embroidered blouses and shawls with a bowler hat perched atop their long black braids. "My grandmother wore her 'chola' dress with pride, and I want to revalue her culture," said Milenda Limachi. Limachi said at first she fell a lot, but a friend encouraged her to continue and she got better. "Here it is mostly men who practice" skateboarding, she said. "But the world will know that in Bolivia there are women who do it." Huara Medina, organizer of the group in Cochabamba, called it "a joy that the group is growing." "We are also in La Paz and little by little we will be reaching other parts of the...