SLOVAKIA

Image

SLOVAKIA

234,571

Total Cases

3,965

Total Deaths

186,683

Total Recovered

43,923

Total Active Cases

+71

New Deaths

+1,544

New Cases


via nhl01/20/2021

Capitals fined $100,000 by NHL for COVID-19 violations - NHL.com

The National Hockey League announced today that it has fined the Washington Capitals $100,000 for Player violations of the League's COVID 19 Protocols which involved social interactions among team members who were in close contact and who were not wearing face coverings.

via wwmt01/15/2021

At a glance: Europe's coronavirus curfews and lockdowns - WWMT-TV

PARIS (AP) — Across Europe and beyond, countries have a patchwork of curfews and lockdowns of varying strictness to combat the spread of the coronavirus. Here, at a glance, are the measures in place in the European Union's 27 member nations and some neighboring countries: Austria: In a third lockdown. Leaving home only allowed for work, medical visits, exercise, groceries. No overnight curfew. Belgium: 10 p. m. to 6 a. m. curfew in French-speaking regions; midnight to 5 a. m.

via cbsaustin01/15/2021

At a glance: Europe's coronavirus curfews and lockdowns - KEYE TV CBS Austin

PARIS (AP) — Across Europe and beyond, countries have a patchwork of curfews and lockdowns of varying strictness to combat the spread of the coronavirus. Here, at a glance, are the measures in place in the European Union's 27 member nations and some neighboring countries: Austria: In a third lockdown. Leaving home only allowed for work, medical visits, exercise, groceries. No overnight curfew. Belgium: 10 p. m. to 6 a. m. curfew in French-speaking regions; midnight to 5 a. m.

via hamodia01/14/2021

Extensive Defense Export Agreement to Be Signed Between Israel and Slovakia - http://hamodia.com

The Slovak government approved the recommendation made by the Slovak Ministry of Defense to procure 17 radar systems manufactured by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI). The agreement, led by the International Defense Cooperation Directorate (SIBAT), in the Israel Ministry of Defense, includes the transfer of


via science.sciencemag.org01/07/2021

COVID-19 testing: One size does not fit all - Science Magazine

Tests for detecting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were developed within days of the release of the virus genome ([ 1 ][1]). Multiple countries have been successful at controlling SARS-CoV-2 transmission by investing in large-scale testing capacity ([ 2 ][2]). Most testing has focused on quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays, which are capable of detecting minute amounts of viral RNA. Although powerful, these molecular tools cannot be scaled to meet demands for more extensive public health testing. To combat COVID-19, the “one-size-fits-all” approach that has dominated and confused decision-making with regard to testing and the evaluation of tests is unsuitable: Diagnostics, screening, and surveillance serve different purposes, demand distinct strategies, and require separate approval mechanisms. By supporting the innovation, approval, manufacturing, and distribution of simpler and cheaper screening and surveillance tools, it will be possible to more effectively limit the spread of COVID-19 and respond to future pandemics. Many types of tests are available for COVID-19 for clinical and public health use (see the figure). Testing can be performed in a central laboratory, at the point of care (POC), or in the community at the workplace, school, or home. COVID-19 testing begins with specimen collection. For medical use, a nasopharyngeal swab collected by a health care professional has been used for detection of virus infections. Demands on testing throughput for COVID-19, however, have driven new collection approaches, including saliva and less invasive nasal swabs. COVID-19 tests include molecular tests such as qPCR, isothermal amplification, and CRISPR, as well as antigen tests that detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins directly. Although rapid antigen tests have lower analytical sensitivity (i.e., require greater amounts of virus material to turn positive) than qPCR-based tests, their ability to detect infectious individuals with culturable virus is as high as for qPCR ([ 3 ][3]). Specificity (i.e., correctly identifying those not infected with SARS-CoV-2) of antigen tests achieves comparable results to molecular tests ([ 4 ][4]). Diagnostic testing for COVID-19 focuses on accurately identifying patients who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 to establish the presence or absence of disease and is performed on symptomatic patients or asymptomatic individuals who are at high risk of infection. This type of testing requires assays that are highly sensitive, so as to not miss COVID-19 patients (false negatives), and specific, so as to not wrongly diagnose SARS-CoV-2–negative individuals as having COVID-19 (false positives). These tests are typically performed by centralized high-complexity laboratories with specialized equipment using qPCR assays, with results that can be reported within 12 to 48 hours. Major bottlenecks in testing, however, have led to turnaround times exceeding 5 to 10 days in some regions, making such tests useless to prevent transmission. POC diagnostic testing at medical facilities can be qPCR assays, isothermal amplification, or antigen-based ([ 4 ][4]). These POC tests often require instruments that run a limited number of tests and can return results in under an hour. The need for an instrument limits the number of tests that can be performed and where they can be used. However, newer antigen tests are becoming available that do not require instruments or skilled operators, potentially allowing for much more distributed POC testing. Surveillance testing of populations can be used both as a tool for understanding historical exposures and as a measure of ongoing community transmission. For the former, serological testing of individuals for the presence of SARS-CoV-2–specific antibodies is used to identify those previously infected. For the latter, surveillance testing can be an effective way to monitor real-time SARS-CoV-2 spread in communities. One promising method is wastewater surveillance, which has been used to assess community transmission of poliovirus ([ 5 ][5]) and has shown potential for COVID-19 ([ 6 ][6]). qPCR testing of wastewater is used to detect SARS-CoV-2, and frequency dynamics of viral genetic material indicate COVID-19 infections in a community. Surveillance can also be performed from swab or saliva samples taken directly from individuals, and, in populations with low COVID-19 prevalence, pooling can be used to increase capacity and lower cost. For surveillance testing, the goal is not identification of every case but rather the collection of data from representative samples that accurately measure prevalence and serve to inform public health policy and resource allocation. Because the focus is on extrapolations to the population and not the individual, tests with known deviations from 100% sensitivity and specificity are still appropriate when the variance can be statistically corrected ([ 7 ][7]). To be most effective, results should include reported qPCR cycle thresholds, which is an estimate of viral load ([ 7 ][7]), to model epidemic trajectory and allow for real-time evaluation of mitigation programs ([ 8 ][8]), including once vaccination programs have begun. Screening testing of asymptomatic individuals to detect people who are likely infectious has been critically underused yet is one of the most promising tools to combat the COVID-19 pandemic ([ 9 ][9]). Infection with SARS-CoV-2 does not lead to symptoms in ∼20 to 40% of cases, and symptomatic disease is preceded by a presymptomatic incubation period ([ 10 ][10]). However, asymptomatic and presymptomatic cases are key contributors to virus spread, complicating our ability to break transmission chains ([ 10 ][10]). Entry screening to detect infectious individuals before accessing facilities (e.g., nursing homes, restaurants, and airports), along with symptom screening and temperature checks, can be beneficial, particularly in high-risk facilities such as skilled nursing facilities. When used strategically, entry-screening measures can be effective at suppressing transmission. Entry screening requires testing that provides rapid results—ideally within 15 min—to be most effective. The required sensitivity and specificity of entry-screening tests are, like all tests, context dependent. Entry-screening tests for a nursing home, for example, must be highly sensitive because the consequences of bringing SARS-CoV-2 into a nursing home can be devastating. Such tests must also be highly specific because the consequences of grouping a false-positive person with COVID-19–positive individuals could be deadly. Conversely, because children have substantially reduced mortality from COVID-19, entry screening into schools might require greater compromise that balances resources and sensitivity to test as many individuals as possible with a need to minimize disruptive false positives. Key to use of tests for entrance screening is that a negative test alone should not be considered sufficient to enter—that should be based on satisfying other requirements, including masks and physical distancing. Conversely, a positive test should be sufficient to bar entry in most settings. Public health screening is potentially the most powerful form of COVID-19 testing, aimed at outbreak suppression through maximizing detection of infectious individuals. This type of screening entails frequent serial testing of large fractions of the population, through self-administered at-home rapid tests, or in the community at high-contact settings, such as schools and workplaces ([ 9 ][9]). Public health screening can achieve herd effects by stopping onward spread through detection of asymptomatic or presymptomatic cases (fig. S1). Notably, not every transmission chain needs to be severed to achieve herd effects. Mathematical models that incorporate relevant variation in viral loads and test accuracy suggest that with frequent testing of a large fraction of a population, a sufficient number of cases could be detected to create herd effects ([ 11 ][11]). For example, Slovakia undertook public health screening to address COVID-19 ([ 12 ][12]): During a 2-week period, ∼80% of the population was screened using rapid antigen tests. With 50,000 cases identified, combined with other public health measures, it reduced incidence by 82% within 2 weeks ([ 12 ][12]). An important feature of large-scale public health screening is that centrally controlled reporting and contact tracing programs are not essential to induce herd effects as they are for surveillance testing. In a robust public health screening program, sufficient numbers of people are routinely testing themselves, such that contact tracing is subsumed by the screening program ([ 11 ][11]). Similar to home pregnancy tests, screening tests should be easy to obtain and administer, fast, and cheap. Like diagnostic tests, these tests must produce very low false-positive rates. If a screening test does not achieve high-enough specificity (e.g., >99.9%), screening programs can be paired with secondary confirmatory testing. Unlike diagnostic tests, however, the sensitivity of screening tests should not be determined based on their ability to diagnose patients but rather by their ability to accurately identify people who are most at risk of transmitting SARS-CoV-2. Such individuals tend to have higher viral loads ([ 13 ][13]), which makes the virus easier to detect ([ 14 ][14]). A focus on identifying infectious people means that frequency and abundance of tests should be prioritized above achieving high analytical sensitivity ([ 11 ][11]). Indeed, loss in sensitivity of individual tests, within reason, can be compensated for by frequency of testing and wider dissemination of tests ([ 9 ][9]). In addition, public health messaging should ensure appropriate expectations of screening, particularly around sensitivity and specificity so that false negatives and false positives do not erode public trust. ![Figure][15]</img> COVID-19 testing strategies Testing for SARS-CoV-2 can be for personal or population health. Collection can be from symptomatic or asymptomatic individuals, as well as from wastewater and swabs of surfaces. The tests may be performed in central laboratories, at the POC, or using rapid tests. Attributes of tests differ according to application. GRAPHIC: KELLIE HOLOSKI/ SCIENCE Tests for public health screening require rapid, decentralized solutions that can be scaled for frequent screening of large numbers of asymptomatic individuals. Lateral-flow antigen tests and upcoming paper-based synthetic biology and CRISPR-based assays fit these needs and could be scaled to tens of millions of daily tests ([ 9 ][9]). These tests are simple and cheap, can be self-administered, and do not require machines to run and return results. The Abbott BinaxNOW rapid antigen test, which recently received an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) in the United States as a diagnostic device, also comes with a smartphone app, allowing self-reporting of COVID-19 status that could be used instead of centralized reporting by public health agencies. Critically, despite being shown to be highly effective at detecting infectious individuals ([ 14 ][14]), very few of these tests are currently approved for screening of asymptomatic individuals, substantially limiting their utility. If such tests were made available direct to consumer (priced to allow equitable access) or produced and provided free of charge by governments, individuals could obtain their COVID-19 status at their own choosing and without complex medical decisions. Testing is a central pillar of clinical and public health response to global health emergencies, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly all testing modalities have a role, and the one-size-fits-all approach to testing by many Western countries has failed. Many lower- and middle-income countries—including Senegal, Vietnam, and Ghana—have fared far better in their COVID-19 response, often using strong testing programs. The focus on diagnostic tests and the use of preexisting authorization pathways focused on qPCR-based clinical diagnostics not only slows the development and deployment of new surveillance and screening tests but also confuses the picture of what metrics effective public health tools should achieve. Testing to diagnose a patient with COVID-19 is fundamentally different from testing a person to prevent onward transmission. Regulatory pathways should be modified to incorporate these differences so that public health and screening tests are appropriately evaluated. It is necessary to be innovative and produce, distribute, and continuously improve the tests that exist to save lives and gain control of the COVID-19 pandemic. [science.sciencemag.org/content/371/6525/126/suppl/DC1][16] 1. [↵][17]1. V. M. Corman et al ., Euro. Surveill. 25, 2000045 (2020). [OpenUrl][18][CrossRef][19][PubMed][20] 2. [↵][21]1. M. G. Baker et al ., N. Engl. J. Med. 383, e56 (2020). [OpenUrl][22][CrossRef][23][PubMed][24] 3. [↵][25]1. A. Pekosz et al ., medRxiv 10.1101/2020.10.02.20205708 (2020). 4. [↵][26]1. R. Weissleder et al ., Sci. Transl. Med. 12, abc1931 (2020). [OpenUrl][27][CrossRef][28] 5. [↵][29]1. H. Asghar et al ., J. Infect. Dis. 210, S294 (2014). [OpenUrl][30][CrossRef][31][PubMed][32] 6. [↵][33]1. A. Nemudryi et al ., Cell Rep. Med. 1, 100098 (2020). [OpenUrl][34][CrossRef][35][PubMed][36] 7. [↵][37]1. R. Kahn et al ., medRxiv 10.1101/2020.05.02.20088765 (2020). 8. [↵][38]1. J. A. Hay et al ., medRxiv 10.1101/2020.10.08.20204222 (2020). 9. [↵][39]1. M. J. Mina et al ., N. Engl. J. Med. 383, e120 (2020). [OpenUrl][40][PubMed][41] 10. [↵][42]1. X. He et al ., Nat. Med. 26, 672 (2020). [OpenUrl][43][CrossRef][44][PubMed][41] 11. [↵][45]1. D. B. Larremore et al ., Sci. Adv. 10.1126/sciadv.abd5393 (2020). 12. [↵][46]1. M. Pavelka et al ., “The effectiveness of population-wide, rapid antigen test based screening in reducing SARS-CoV-2 infection prevalence in Slovakia,” CMMID Repository, 11 November 2020; <https://bit.ly/36BkxV5>. 13. [↵][47]1. E. A. Meyerowitz et al ., Ann. Intern. Med. 10.7326/M20-5008 (2020). 14. [↵][48]1. V. M. Corman et al ., medRxiv 10.1101/2020.11.12.20230292 (2020). 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via wsiltv01/01/2021

The Latest: Tens of thousands on Vegas strip despite warning - WSIL TV

LAS VEGAS — Tens of thousands of people were walking on the casino-lined Las Vegas Strip on New Year’s Eve by early evening despite a plea from Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak that people reconsider their plans to go out and celebrate. While shopping, gambling, drinking yard-long frozen cocktails and gawking at the sights, most everyone

via metro.us12/27/2020

Czech Republic starts coronavirus vaccine rollout - Metro US

<div class="at-above-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.metro.us/czech-republic-starts-coronavirus/"></div>PRAGUE (Reuters) -Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis became the first person in the country to be given a vaccine against the new coronavirus on Sunday, as European Union member states begin a pushback against the pandemic which is surging across the continent. Hungary and Slovakia stole a march on their fellow EU nations as they […]<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.metro.us/czech-republic-starts-coronavirus/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Related Posts below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post-recommended addthis_tool" ></div><!-- AddThis Related Posts generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->

via inform.kz01/15/2021

SLK: Slovakia cannot afford mass testing right now - Kazinform

BRATISLAVA. KAZINFORM - Slovakia currently cannot afford mass testing, as it brings more risks than benefits, said Slovak Medical Chamber (SLK) president Marian Kollar following his meeting with Health Minister Marek Krajci (OLaNO) on Wednesday (January 13), adding he sees the lockdown as a solution to the coronavirus pandemic for now, TASR reports.

via kfoxtv01/15/2021

At a glance: Europe's coronavirus curfews and lockdowns - KFOX El Paso

PARIS (AP) &mdash; Across Europe and beyond, countries have a patchwork of curfews and lockdowns of varying strictness to combat the spread of the coronavirus. Here, at a glance, are the measures in place in the European Union's 27 member nations and some neighboring countries: Austria: In a third lockdown. Leaving home only allowed for work, medical visits, exercise, groceries. No overnight curfew. Belgium: 10 p. m. to 6 a. m. curfew in French-speaking regions; midnight to 5 a. m.


via schengenvisainfo01/14/2021

Austria Closes Three Border Crossings With Slovakia, Requires Registration of All Arrivals - SchengenVisaInfo.com

Austria’s government has announced that three border crossing points with their neighbouring country- Slovakia will be temporarily closed from January 14, due to the Coronavirus pandemic’s rapid upsurge. According to Slovakia’s Ministry of Interior statement, three of the following border crossing points will temporarily suspend their operations, until further notice: Angern an der March – […]

via inform.kz01/13/2021

Organization of mass testing to be coordinated by district offices in Slovakia - Kazinform

BRATISLAVA. KAZINFORM - Mass testing for coronavirus in Slovakia will take place in the penultimate weekend of January, with district offices being in charge of its coordination in individual districts, according to the conclusions of Monday’s (January 11) meeting of entities engaged in the preparations for mass testing announced by Prime Minister Igor Matovic (OLaNO) at a news conference following the Cabinet session, TASR reports.

via urdupoint01/05/2021

Police Shut Slovak City of Nitra Over 'Critical' COVID-19 Situation - Mayor - UrduPoint News

Police have closed Slovakias western city of Nitra for non-residents on Tuesday to rein in surging COVID-19 cases that have put local hospitals on the brink, Mayor Marek Hattas told reporters.The situation in city hospitals is critical due to the growing number of new coronavirus patients. We are ..

via thetelegraph12/29/2020

Germany edges Slovakia 4-3 in OT at world juniors - Alton Telegraph

EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) - Mario Zimmerman scored a power-play goal four minutes into overtime, lifting Germany to a 4-3 win over Slovakia on Monday night in the world junior hockey championships. Tim Stutzle scored twice and the Ottawa Senators' prospect helped set up Zimmerman's goal that gave Germany its first win in the tournament. Florian Elias also scored for Germany and Simon Gnyp had three assists. Michal Mrazik had two goals for Slovakia, and Oleksiy Mykluka also scored. Despite dressing just five defensemen and nine forwards, Germany finished with a 32-25 edge on shots. It's been a difficult tournament for Germany. Nine players tested positive for COVID-19 after arriving in Edmonton, preventing the team from running a real practice until Christmas Day and leaving the squad short-handed for preliminary round games. After a 16-2 loss to Canada on Saturday, Germany struck first against Slovakia as Stutzle found the back of the net 5:39 into the game. The two sides traded goals through the first and second periods, then played to a draw in the third, forcing extra time. Mykluka was called for hooking 2:28 into overtime and with the clock ticking down, Zimmerman's shot from the slot found its way through traffic and beat Slovakia goalie Simon Latkoczy. Germany's win leaves Switzerland as the lone team without a victory in Group A. Slovakia will be back in action Wednesday when they take on Finland. Germany will face Switzerland later the same day. SWEDEN 4, AUSTRIA 0 Carolina Hurricanes prospect Noel Gunler scored twice and Sweden got its 54th consecutive preliminary round victory at the world junior hockey championship. Lucas Raymond, picked fourth overall by the Detroit Red Wings at the 2020 NHL draft, had a goal and an assist, and Theodor Niederbach also...

via kyivpost12/27/2020

Euronews: Germany, Hungary and Slovakia start COVID-19 vaccinations a day earlier than EU's plan | KyivPost - Ukraine's Global Voice - Kyiv Post

Germany, Hungary and Slovakia started their COVID-19 vaccination campaign on Saturday, a day earlier than the European Commission’s planned coordinated roll-out across all member states. EU member states each received a first shipment of just under 10,000 doses of the Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine on Saturday but vaccination was not supposed to start across the bloc’s 27 […]


via newschannel901/15/2021

At a glance: Europe's coronavirus curfews and lockdowns - WTVC

PARIS (AP) &mdash; Across Europe and beyond, countries have a patchwork of curfews and lockdowns of varying strictness to combat the spread of the coronavirus. Here, at a glance, are the measures in place in the European Union's 27 member nations and some neighboring countries: Austria: In a third lockdown. Leaving home only allowed for work, medical visits, exercise, groceries. No overnight curfew. Belgium: 10 p. m. to 6 a. m. curfew in French-speaking regions; midnight to 5 a. m.

via brnodaily01/14/2021

Austria Closes Several Border Crossings With Czech Republic and Slovakia - Brno Daily

Due to a rapid surge of coronavirus cases, Austria will temporarily close over 40 minor border crossings with the Czech Republic and Slovakia from January 14th. Anyone wishing to cross the border from January 15th must register online in advance. Photo: Border Austria-Czech Republic (Schrattenberg -

via schengenvisainfo01/14/2021

Austria Closes Three Border Crossings With Slovakia, Requires Registration of All Arrivals - SchengenVisaInfo.com - SchengenVisaInfo.com

Austria’s government has announced that three border crossing points with their neighbouring country- Slovakia will be temporarily closed from January 14, due to the Coronavirus pandemic’s rapid upsurge. According to Slovakia’s Ministry of Interior statement, three of the following border crossing points will temporarily suspend their operations, until further notice: Angern an der March – […]

via inform.kz01/12/2021

Slovakian PM announces plan to carry out mass testing on weekly basis - Kazinform

BRATISLAVA. KAZINFORM - Prime Minister Igor Matovic (OLaNO) announced on Monday after a session of the Government that dealt with the current situation surrounding the coronavirus pandemic that there’ll be further rounds of mass testing for COVID-19 in the country that will take place on a weekly basis, starting as of next weekend at latest, TASR reports.

via myjournalcourier01/04/2021

The Latest: China makes parts of province high danger zones - Jacksonville Journal-Courier

BEIJING - China has designated parts of Hebei province near Beijing as a coronavirus high danger zone after 14 new cases of COVID-19 were found. Eleven of those cases were in Shijiazhuang city, where some events for the 2022 Winter Olympics will be held. An additional 30 people tested positive for the virus without showing any symptoms, the provincial health authority said Tuesday. The other three COVID-19 cases were in the city of Yantai. Parts of Shijiazhuang were designated high danger areas, meaning they will undergo stricter testing and isolation measures, while parts of Yantai were registered as medium risk areas. Medical investigators were looking into whether a single event such as a family gathering had been the origin of many of the Hebei cases. China has recorded a total of 87,183 cases of COVID-19, with 4,634 deaths. People who have tested positive but not shown symptoms have been counted separately from its official COVID-19 tally. Wary of another wave of infections, China is urging tens of millions of migrant workers to stay put during next month's Lunar New Year holiday, usually the world's largest annual human migration. Classes are also being dismissed a week earlier than usual and tourists are being told not to come to Beijing for holidays. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: - UK takes big step on the vaccine front, starts giving out first coronavirus vaccine shots from Oxford-AstraZeneca - Congress has convened for a new session, with strict COVID-19 protocols in place - Fauci says faster vaccination rate offers a 'glimmer of hope,' says Biden's pledge of 100 million shots in his 1st 100 days is achievable - Vaccines are a distant thought in Somalia, where coronavirus is spreading with little being done to stop it - Black California surgeon...

via cochranenow12/28/2020

Canada downs Slovakia to improve to 2 - 0 at World Juniors - CochraneNow.com

Canada's second game of the World Junior Hockey Tournament in Edmonton was much tougher than their first. After beating up on an undermanned Team Germany whose ranks were depleted by eight players who were self-isolating after testing positive for COVID-19, 16 - 2 on Boxing Day, Canada faced off against Slovakia yesterday (December 27). Philip Tomasino got the game-winner and picked up an assist in a 3 - 1 Canadian win. The final Canadian goal came into an empty net with just:13 seconds remaining in the game. With the win, Canada improves to 2 and 0 while Slovakia drops to 1 and 1. Canada is tied for first place in Group A with Finland. The Canucks have today off before facing winless Switzerland tomorrow night at 6:00 pm MST.