Long lines as Serbia allows Covid jabs without appointment amid all-out drive - Yahoo News UK

by uk.news.yahoo 04/11/2021

Long queues are seen outside vaccination centres in Serbia on Sunday 11 April, as the country allows jabs without appointment amid an all-out immunisation drive. Serbia has one of Europe’s highest rates of vaccination, having approved a wide-range of jabs, including the US-German Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, Russia’s Sputnik V and Sinopharm's Chinese vaccine. According to the latest data, a total of about 2.65 million doses of coronavirus vaccines were given in Serbia, of which about 1.2 million people received both doses. During periods of over-supply, the country has even allowed residents of neighbouring countries to come to Serbia to be vaccinated for free.


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With more than 135 million coronavirus cases and nearly 3 million deaths from the virus, according to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Research Center, signs of the virus’ fortitude and lockdown fatigue abound.  China said it is considering using vaccines developed in other countries in conjunction with vaccines developed in China to boost the efficacy of China’s vaccines.  A top Chinese health expert recently told a conference that public health officials must “consider ways to solve the issue that efficacy rates of existing vaccines are not high,” citing Gao Fu, the head of China’s Center for

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Lebanon's Central Bank said on Wednesday that its interventions had contained inflation at 84% in recent months, adding that inflation could have risen to as high as 275% if it had not acted. The bank also said the government must quickly come up with a plan for subsidies to prevent wasting the country's reserves. It said Lebanon faced a dangerous situation and warned of “social and economic” consequences of any delay in acting.

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During the civil war that ended over 30 years ago Abla Barotta survived shelling and clashes, but she now fears a "slow death" from Lebanon's worst economic crisis in decades. The 58-year-old mother of three is a survivor who worries she will soon join the more than 50 percent of Lebanese today living in poverty. Echoing a common refrain on television and at public gatherings,